​solo works

​aka-darbari-java | magic realism

​Cover painting:

'Soundscape' by
Mati Klarwein

Cover painting: 'Soundscape' by
Mati Klarwein

atmospherics

19​83

​Editions EG EEGCD-31

1983 • 44:10

Editions EG EEGCD-31

1983 • 44:10


1  Empire I 2:00

2  Empire II 4:53

3  Empire III 7:09

4  Empire IV 5:13

5  Empire V 3:40

6  Darbari Extension I 13:52

7  Darbari Extension II 7:23​


1  Empire I 2:00

2  Empire II 4:53

3  Empire III 7:09

4  Empire IV 5:13

5  Empire V 3:40

6  Darbari Extension I 13:52

7  Darbari Extension II 7:23

​Jon Hassell—trumpet, keyboards, treatments

Abdou Mboup—drums

Daniel Lanois—treatments

Jon Hassell—trumpet, keyboards, treatments

Abdou Mboup—drums

Daniel Lanois—treatments

​All titles by Jon Hassell
except 'Empire II' by Jon Hassell and Daniel Lanois

Produced by Jon Hassell with Daniel Lanois

All titles by Jon Hassell except 'Empire II'

by Jon Hassell and Daniel Lanois

Produced by Jon Hassell with Daniel Lanois
Lovely Music 1021

1977 • 51:19

 

1  Toucan Ocean 3:50

2  Viva Shona 7:03

3  Hex 6:23

4  Blues Nile 9:54

5  Vernal Equinox 21:58

6  Caracas Night, September 11, 1975 2:11

 

Jon Hassell—trumpet, Fender Rhodes (specially tuned and altered by Buchla and Arp Synthesizers)

Nana Vasconçelos—congas, shakers, ocean, talking drum, bells, tropical birds

David Rosenboom—mbira, rattles, tabla, dumbek

Miguel Frasconi—claves, bells

Nicolas Kilbourn—talking drum, mbira

William Winant—kanjira, rattles

Drone—Serge Synthesizer, Motorola Scalatron

Night Creatures of Altamira

Perrasita—distant barking

 

All titles by Jon Hassell

Produced by Jon Hassell

​album notes

MAGIC REALISM • Like the video technique of "keying in" where any background may be electronically inserted or deleted independently of foreground, the ability to bring the actual sound of musics of various epochs and geographical origins all together in the same compositional frame marks a unique point in history. • A trumpet, branched into a chorus of trumpets by computer, traces the motifs of the Indian raga DARBARI over Senegalese drumming recorded in Paris and a background mosaic of frozen moments from an exotic Hollywood orchestration of the 1950's (a sonic texture like a "Mona Lisa" which, in close up, reveals itself to be made up of tiny reproductions of the Taj Mahal), while the ancient call of an AKA pygmy voice in the Central African Rainforest—transposed to move in sequences of chords unheard of until the 20th century—rises and fails among gamelan-like cascades, multiplications of a single "digital snapshot" of a traditional instrument played on the Indonesian island of JAVA, on the other side of the world. • Music which is to this degree self-referential, in which larger parts are related to and/or generated from smaller parts, shares certain qualities with "white" classical music of the past.

AKA/DARBARI/JAVA is a proposal for a "coffee-colored" classical music of the future—both in terms of the adoption of entirely new modes of structural organisation (as might be suggested by the computer ability to re-arrange, dot-by-dot, a sound or video image) and in terms of the expansion of the "allowable" musical vocabulary in which one may speak this structure—leaving behind the ascetic face which Eurocentric tradition has come to associate with serious expression.

– jon hassell

album notes

MAGIC REALISM • Like the video technique of "keying in" where any background may be electronically inserted or deleted independently of foreground, the ability to bring the actual sound of musics of various epochs and geographical origins all together in the same compositional frame marks a unique point in history. • A trumpet, branched into a chorus of trumpets by computer, traces the motifs of the Indian raga DARBARI over Senegalese drumming recorded in Paris and a background mosaic of frozen moments from an exotic Hollywood orchestration of the 1950's (a sonic texture like a "Mona Lisa" which, in close up, reveals itself to be made up of tiny reproductions of the Taj Mahal), while the ancient call of an AKA pygmy voice in the Central African Rainforest—transposed to move in sequences of chords unheard of until the 20th century—rises and fails among gamelan-like cascades, multiplications of a single "digital snapshot" of a traditional instrument played on the Indonesian island of JAVA, on the other side of the world. • Music which is to this degree self-referential, in which larger parts are related to and/or generated from smaller parts, shares certain qualities with "white" classical music of the past.

AKA/DARBARI/JAVA is a proposal for a "coffee-colored" classical music of the future—both in terms of the adoption of entirely new modes of structural organisation (as might be suggested by the computer ability to re-arrange, dot-by-dot, a sound or video image) and in terms of the expansion of the "allowable" musical vocabulary in which one may speak this structure—leaving behind the ascetic face which Eurocentric tradition has come to associate with serious expression.

jon hassell

All text, images and sound not otherwise attributed are protected by
copyright © 2017 Nyen Music.
All paintings by Mati Klarwein © 2017 Klarwein-Archives.
Used by permission of the Klarwein family.

A childhood in Memphis, a classical conservatory education, composition and electronic music study with Stockhausen in Cologne; a passage through the New York minimalist sphere with Terry Riley, Reich, Glass; having a window opened onto the world's music and a new approach to the trumpet via vocal master Pandit Pran Nath; a questioning and deconstruction of the European dichotomy between classical and popular, sacred and sensual; a pioneer of digital transformation and sampling—all of this led to Fourth World—the unique blend which Jon has described as "worldly music" to underline a more subtle equation at work and discourage the simplistic labeling of "world," "jazz," "classical," "minimal," or "ambient."